WRITER’S BLOCK STIMULATOR

by Gail Gaymer Martin

Most everyone at one time or another goes blank while writing. My technique is to exercise–go for a walk or more likely get on my stationary bike and pedal. Perhaps this stimulates the blood flow to my brain or just removes me from the problem I’m facing in the book, but I often solve the issue while exercising in some way. The serious writer’s block is the loss of creativity. This can last for long periods of time and can’t be resolved pedalling a stationary bike for a half hour. So I’m really talking about those short blank moments when we don’t know how to resolve a scene or create an amazing opening or devise grabbing dialogue.

A writer friend sent me a link to a site called 911 Writers Block. Though the examples are limited, I thought the tool was a great idea. The link is: Click here: 911 Writers Block

But the more interesting question is: What do you do when you go blank? When you can’t decide how to resolve a scene? When your setting becomes dull? Please share your ideas with me in the comments section. You can also contact me through my website. I will enjoy sharing some of your ideas on this blog. Have fun with 911 Writers Block.

Used with permission: Writing Fiction Right Blog by Gail Gaymer Martin

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Multi-award-winning novelist Gail Gaymer Martin writes Christian fiction for Love Inspired and Barbour Publishing, where she was honored by Heartsong readers as their Favorite Author of 2008. Gail has forty-nine contracted novels with over three million books in print. She is the author of Writers Digest’s Writing the Christian Romance. Gail is a co-founder of American Christian Fiction Writers, a keynote speaker at churches, libraries and civic organizations  and presents workshops at conference across the US. She was recently named one of the four best novelists in the Detroit area by CBS local news.

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